Adelaide City Optometrist | Book an Eye Test
Adelaide City Optometrist | Book an Eye Test
182 Hutt Street
Adelaide, 5000
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How Glasses Can Improve Your Working From Home Productivity

  • by: Adelaide City Optometrist
  • April 9, 2020

As more Australians begin to work from home due to Coronavirus, a number of us are struggling to remember what day it is and differentiate between “work time” and “relaxing time”. Although it may seem silly, dressing up when working from home is one of the simplest and most effective ways to boost your productivity, boost your mood and improve your mental health.

 

Many of us have invested in products to improve our home office or workspace such as a new desk chair, home filing system or laptop table. But it’s important to invest in ourselves too as these investments will carry on past the social distancing phase.

 

A 2012 study found that clothing or accessories can boost an individual’s mood. Specific items of clothing have values to us that we have assigned to them which affect our mindset whilst wearing them. For example; an old, paint-covered jumper may express creativity whilst a neat blouse expresses work productivity. This doesn’t mean you need to wear a suit from home but instead ditch the track pants and hoodie for a more smart-casual approach.

 

Whether you’re already finding working from home difficult, or are worried about your children now online studying. In this blog, we’re going to help you learn how you can use your glasses to set yourself up for success when working from home.

 

VIDEO CONFERENCING

As many of us now use online conferences to communicate with clients and co-workers, it leaves us with a small period of interpersonal communication with those outside our household. In some cases, you may only have a small amount of time to make yourself, presentable, likeable and memorable to a client. Whilst video conferencing, often we can only see from the shoulders up, so a full outfit may not give you the lasting impression you need. A shortcut method to stand out during these video conferences is by accessorising. For some, this may mean jewellery, but we, of course, are speaking about glasses.

 

Glasses are a great way to dress up any outfit and when video conferencing, ensure that the focus will be on your face. A 2019 study showed that people who wear glasses appear more intelligent, trustworthy and of a higher socio-economic class. But glasses can also be used as a fashion statement to break away from the pack. Using colour is a common way to “spice” up most outfits but wearing colourful glasses can make the wearer appear creative, fun and warm to their peers. 

 

Depending on what your goal is, glasses can help you get there. Whether it’s a bold pair, something colourful or an old classic; glasses will leave a lasting impression on your colleagues.

 

MIXING UP YOUR ROUTINE:

As well as dressing for work and leisure, we still need to take small measures to maintain our mental health. Changing small steps in your daily eye routine can help you take your productivity to a much higher standard. If you wear both glasses and contact lenses, we recommend saving your glasses for workdays and contact lenses for the weekend. Wearing your glasses can help put you in a productive mindset to sit down and complete your work throughout the day. In contrast, wearing your contact lenses can give you the feeling of freedom and relaxation. They allow you to exercise, play with the kids and other various activities without the worry of your glasses falling off. Such a small step in your daily eye routine will do wonders for your mental health and if a regular contact wearer, will prolong the span of any one-day contact lens packs.

 

 

IMPROVE YOUR EYE HEALTH:

On a regular workday, most of us would spend 50-70% of our time working on a computer or a screen related device and the other time partaking in face-to-face interactions or completing paperwork. Now that we are working from home, almost all of us would be spending 80-100% of our time on computers doing online paperwork, online conference calls, and our regular computer work. But have you considered the damage this may be doing to your eyes?

 

When we look at our computer all day we are exposing our eyes to the blue light emitting from the screen. After long periods, this blue-light exposure can become harmful to your eyes causing eye strain and also disrupt your sleep quality.

 

A blue light filter lens blocks blue light and protects your eyes from the damage prolonged screen use may cause. These lenses do not have a tinge but are clear as a regular lens so they can be used at any given point of the day and in public. Although some devices offer a “night shift” option which displays your screen in a warm tint lessening the blue light effects, this may affect those who need to see the screen in certain colourways.

 

Our bodies associate blue light with daytime, so prolonged exposure can disrupt sleeping patterns, cause eye strain and make it harder to sleep at night. It is recommended that we stop digital screen use at least 2 hours before going to bed. If your work or lifestyle makes this unrealistic, or you have excessive screen use during the day, we recommend using blue light filter glasses to help preserve your eye health.

 

We also offer blue light lenses for those under 18 years of age, as they have screen use times the same, if not more than most adults who work on a computer all day. Now that your children are studying online, either for school or university. Keep in mind that although they are young, this prolonged screen exposure may have severe health consequences for them in the future.

 

 

At Adelaide City Optometrist, we offer a blue light filter on all our glasses at our customer’s request. Where other retailer’s blue light lenses block 20% of the harmful light rays, our lenses stop 90%. Make an appointment today to discuss if blue light lenses are for you and how you can change your daily routine for the better during Covid-19.